Monday, June 29, 2015

Saturday Show #100: Bohemians by George Saunders // Austin Writing Workshop // Westin Hotel at the Domain // Frank Zeus Marcopolos

The Austin Writing Workshop met at the Westin at the Domain in Austin, Texas, to discuss literature and philosophy. This is the result. This is the 100th episode of Saturday Show. If you enjoy this podcast, please use the Amazon.com portal on this page to support us and help ensure we can keep producing these podcasts.

Sat Show 100: BOHEMIANS by GEOrge SAUnders, the iterative fucker

Monday, June 22, 2015

Saturday Show Literary Podcast #99: The Apologizer by Milan Kundera

Saturday Show 99 --> MILAN KUNDERA



Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Clips from an aborted podcast

We recorded at a Whole Foods for the first time last week, and the sound quality wasn't up to snuff. For short tidbits, though, it may be okay. So, feast on these tasty tidbitties.















Enjoy,

Zeus

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

And Now, a Message from Joel Osteen

Saturday, May 09, 2015

Promo Codes to Get A CAR CRASH OF SORTS by Frank Marcopolos for NADA

As per usual, ACX gives me these promo codes so you can grab an audiobook for free. These are for A CAR CRASH OF SORTS, so if you're a cheap bastard and love to get your mitts on cool stuff for no dinero, these are for you. Here are the instructions they tell me to pass along...

1) Go to my book's page on Audible.com: http://www.audible.com/pd/Fiction/A-Car-Crash-of-Sorts-Audiobook/B00WYDTM8M/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1431178966&sr=1-1

2) Add the audiobook to your cart.

3) Create a new Audible.com account or log in.

4) Enter the promo code and click "Redeem" on the cart page.

5) To change the price from full price to $0.00, click the box next to "1 Credit" and click the "update" button to apply the credit to your purchase.

6) Complete checkout, and start listening to the free copy of the book.

Your 25 free Audible.com download codes for A Car Crash of Sorts by Frank Marcopolos:

B29SZWZN2ZC4Y
53QY76QF9L5DD
Y6KQC4L6RTFNR
TJ59M94MDXGZ6
MCLWZWQKDU8BR
CJ2MW7TM4DFT5
M7SF9BYHTETLJ
Q7G98R3WEEHFR
B35HFKQ76LQXR
AJR2875764TQ9
TKYA6KRABKTSL
KQRSAULCYZZCM
GKDN2N7WZ94RD
3Y9CDTS6R5JX4
LABUZ8R6M35TU
R44CQCWDX6MSP
TNB99MRC9FAMD
4FPUDH4LFWR3Z
L675Y7PBSHUPC
TTXL24Q7NXBWA
46Z6M3YLH5EHA
APFSS64Q8GD87
4H9KYAPS6PZ7E
XFKTTL28NTZNE
3XBSLFY6AJNH8

If you do use one of the codes, I'd truly appreciate it if you could leave a review! Thanks.

Sunday, May 03, 2015

The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce

Saturday Show Literary Podcast #95: The Pura Principle by Junot Diaz

Is art completely subjective? Or are there rules which need to be observed in order for an artistic project to be successful? This podcast explores. Plus, why Junot Diaz is terrible, considering subjectivity and objectivity as the same thing, and the limits of scientific empirical inquiry. Plus wine and laughs galore!

Saturday Show Literary Podcast #95 -- CLICK HERE

0:00 Excerpt from the Podcast

0:29 Advert for Infinite Ending: Ten Stories by Frank Marcopolos

1:05 Group discussion of the short story, "The Pura Principle" by Junot Diaz, including keeping the professional stories anonymous for critiquing, 98% story-hating ratio, Frank Marcopolos's Italian heritage, having free reign to criticize the story, professional writers, the mystery of the anonymity of the author and its implications, being engaged in the story, losing one's eyeballs, plot summary, elevation of the narrator, literary allusions and references, Horsefaces of the Apocalypse, Dominican characters, doing research in a medium amount, Lemoncello, tolerant readers, generous readers, diversity of opinions, not reading the story (bad!), thinking the main character was a female, being an asshole reviewer, aesthetics of a sentence, The Philosophy of Art, bad details, having no literary merit, clarity and concision of narrative language, variety of characters, plot attractiveness, slice of life nature of the story, Raymond Carver, Richard Ford, biculturalism, realistic literary fiction technique, reseach versus experience pouring into the writing, not being able to escape the gravity of one's environment including family and culture, Sam Harris, free will/determinism, taking science to its limit, maximizing Hispanic writing, lionizing themeless writing, pro-culturism, erasing the theme, pseudo-intellectual literary marketing, Rock Springs, the gold mine, the monkey, subjective extreme reactions, guessing game about who the writer is, MFAs, Tim O'Brien, studying Junot Diaz, The New Yorker, Is Frank Marcopolos a better writer than Junot Diaz, New Yorker standards of quality, Hair Jewelery, Stephen King, not trusting Cory, Laura Vandenberg, more plot summary, a writer uprising!, Chuck Pahlaniuk, a horrible passage from 50 Shades of Grey, Charles Bukowski, Joyce Carol Oates, E.L. James, Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling, A Casual Vacancy, cultural snowballing, fame as a momentum, The Story of O, and Cory's love of cults.

50:30 Group discussion of the first two chapters of Frank Marcopolos's new novel, including it being a "real" story, enjoying the story, one of the best things Frank has written, fine-tuning the characters, story being closer to the bone, losing the game, feeling the loss, the moral courage, ending with a mystery, the writing works, the chapters being better, honing of the craft, cleaner narrative, taking notes, revelation of plot, seeming trite, filler dialogue, the balance of art, Enzo being likeable, heavy-handedness, the unimportance of the dialogue, dialogue doing multiple things, character diversity, stories siding with the absurd, Rock Springs (again), Richard Ford (again), Sideways, car thieves, the monkey story (again), rich versus filler dialogue, feeling like Chapter 1, Name of the Rose, mako sharks, Chuck Pahlaniuk, out of place details, dryologue, slickness, Jaws, two different backstories, details doing work, shaking up a story is only as good as the shaking up, long debate about leaving in the detail about a mako shark.

1:20:00 Group discussion of a member-submitted poem, including reading and interpretive dance, babies being thrown out the window, explanation of why a poem was submitted, poetry slams, reading the poem, coffeehouse applause, mawkish performance, acting, and performance pieces being considered art.

1:27:00 Discussion of the Philosophy and Rules of Art, including knowing the rules of art, why this group is different than all others, the philosophy and rules of art transcending each individual art form, spoken word poetry, slam poetry, Henry Rollins, the real components of storytelling, bullshit sentimentality, defining the rules of art, philosophy is fundamental to all things, subjectivity, subjectivity is the same thing as objectivity, proving things on an Etch-a-Sketch, proving objectivity, gravity, scientific method, repetition, cultural influences, Vivaldi, changing aesthetic cultural preferences, Socrates, Des Cartes, politics, objective teleologicals, science and religion, language components outside of our own consciousness, assuming an objective reality to get through the day, stop signs, the colored dress on the Internet, Inception, the thinking you do about the subjective and objective makes you a better writer, the eloquence of a writer, and that of an artist, Bukowski, and drinking your head off.

1:48:28 End of Podcast

Saturday, February 14, 2015

ANTHEM by Ayn Rand (Audiobook)

If you're a fan of Ayn Rand and have never read ANTHEM, you might want to check out this new audiobook on cdbaby, narrated by me: ANTHEM by Aynd Rand (Audiobook) - Performed by Frank Marcopolos

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Saturday Show #87: Everything is Green by David Foster Wallace

Saturday Show #87: Everything is Green by David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace was a literary genius who hung himself due to a life-long battle with clinical depression. His best-known work is the mammoth novel INFINITE JEST. This title comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet:

Yorick is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. He is the dead court jester whose skull is exhumed by the gravedigger in Act 5, Scene 1, of the play. The sight of Yorick's skull evokes a monologue from Prince Hamlet on mortality:

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? (Hamlet, V.i)